NONFICTION

The Great Railway Bazaar
The Old Patagonian Express
The Kingdom By The Sea
Sailing Through China
Sunrise With Seamonsters
The Imperial Way
Riding The Iron Rooster
To The Ends Of The Earth
The Happy Isles Of Oceania
The Pillars Of Hercules
Sir Vidia's Shadow
Fresh Air Fiend
Best American Travel Writing
Dark Star Safari
Ghost Train to the Eastern Star
The Tao of Travel
The Last Train to Zona Verde
Best American Travel Writing 2014

FICTION

Waldo
Fong And The Indians
Murder In Mount Holly
Girls At Play
Jungle Lovers
Sinning With Annie
Saint Jack
The Black House
The Family Arsenal
The Consul's File
Picture Palace
A Christmas Card
London Snow
World's End
The Mosquito Coast
The London Embassy
Half Moon Street
O-zone
The White Mans Burden
My Secret History
Chicago Loop
Millroy The Magician
My Other Life
Kowloon Tong
The Collected Short Novels
Hotel Honolulu
Nurse Wolf And Dr. Sacks
Stranger At The Palazzo D'Oro
Two Stars
Blinding Light
The Elephanta Suite
A Dead Hand
The Lower River
Mr. Bones

 
 

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Murder In Mount Holly

Book Description
Murder in Mount Holly is set at that time in American history when Lyndon Johnson was having trouble with his gall bladder. It was incidentally the same time that Herbie Gneiss was forced to leave college and made to work at the Kant-Brake toy factory (manufacturers of war toys for children) in order to keep his fifteen-stone widowed mother from starvation. Mr. Gibbon, veteran of three wars, also works at Kant-Brake; when Herbie is drafted into the army, Mr. Gibbon falls in love with Herbie’s mother and persuades her to live with him in Miss Ball’s rooming house. Because Herbie is fighting nobly for his country, Mr. Gibbon feels that he, Miss Ball and Mrs. Gneiss should do something patriotic as well. They decide to rob the Mount Holly Trust Company because it is managed by a small dark man who is ... probably a communist. There are complications: Miss Ball’s Puerto Rican lover, Juan (“Warren”); Mrs. Gneiss’s inertia; several necessary murders; Herbie’s death in action; and, of course, the difficulty of three people over sixty executing a daylight bank robbery. But none of these complications prevents the old threesome from seeing their mission through to the end. They triumph, striking a blow for old age and for ... America, proving the words of two commentators on the American scene, the poet e. e. cummings, who said “The pigpen is mightier than the sword,” and the militant H. Rap Brown, who will be remembered for saying, “Violence is as American as cherry pie.”

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Original Publish Date :
1969

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